15 Pages A Day

Bite-Sized Reads for Business Breakthroughs

 

They say that, on average, business leaders read one book per week. Inspired? Since juggling family, life and work makes finding time to read tough, we asked a diverse group of business leaders to share the 15 pages (or less) that inspired them this year, and helped spark that next big idea. Studies show that reading just 15 pages a day can help improve cognitive muscles and boost creativity - so why wait? Kickstart your journey to the top today with the 2019 Power15 List! 

 

Pledge your 15 pages a day

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Laura Whipple headshot

Radical Candor by Kim Scott, Chapter 1: "Building Radically Candid Relationships"

Recommend by Laura Whipple, Co-Founder & CEO of Scout Books: "If you want to learn more about being a strong leader while staying human, start with the first chapter of Kim Scott's powerful book, Radical Candor. In these easy-to-read 15 pages, she reminds all of us that relationships, not power, drive you forward as a leader."  

The Moon: A Giant Leap For Mankind, TIME Magazine, July 1969 Issue

Recommended by Bruce Schroder, President of Moe’s Southwest Grill: “I love this Time Magazine article chronicling the Moon landing back in 1969. It squarely affirms the art of the possible: ‘It was, in any event a shining reaffirmation of the optimistic premise that whatever man imagines he can bring to pass.’”

Bruce Schroder headshot
Tricia Han headshot

The Confidence Gap by Katty Kay and Claire Shipman, The Atlantic, May 2014 Issue

Recommend by Tricia Han, CEO of Daily Burn: “Why are women under-represented in top leadership roles? How do we navigate challenges in the workplace? Is there just one path to success? There’s lots of interesting research out there to experiment with. This piece is one of the perspectives I talk about with other women all the time."

Erin Condren headshot

Dare to Lead by Brené Brown,  Part 1, Section 5, “Curiosity and Grounded Confidence”

Recommended by Erin Condren, Chief Style Officer & Founder of Erin Condren: “I love how this book champions the power of vulnerability in being an effective leader, and the short sections are easy to dip in and out of. As we add to our ever-expanding team, it's exciting to witness and harness this new wave of leadership, and books like this inspire me to keep up!”

Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian warns always-on work culture creating 'broken people' by Kelsey Gee, Wall Street Journal, May 21, 2019

Recommended by Mike Grillo, Co-Founder & CEO of Gravity Products: “As a founder and CEO, there is some instant gratification from the likes you get on Instagram when you post pictures of the team working late hours and "hustling”. It almost encourages an unsustainable pace. Alexis’s perspective as a founder who has come to realize the dangers of this culture gives entrepreneurs like myself permission to prioritize self care.”

Mike Grillo headshot
Eric Warner headshot

What the Hell is Going On by David Perrell

Recommended by Eric Warner, Brewmaster at Karbach Brewing Co.: “This is one of the most eye opening essays I’ve read this year.  It focuses on how the rapid transformation from “information scarcity to information abundance” has dramatically reshaped commerce, education and politics. As an entrepreneur in the CPG space, the opening section on commerce was most inspirational for me.”

Why Every Startup Needs “Pillar People” First by Suzanne Abate

Recommended by Ashley Summer, Co-founder of Quilt: “In the start-up world, hiring can be one of the hardest activities - and one of the most important. This framework helped me think about how I want to approach interviewing, and who I want alongside me building Quilt. Having pillar people on your team makes all the difference!”

Ashley Sumner headshot
Kirsten

Bad Blood by John Carreyrou, Chapter 25

Recommend by Kirsten Daru, VP General Counsel at Tile“Not only was this a page turner I couldn't put down, but it’s also a good reminder that transparency and integrity are central to every enterprise's success. If you don't want people to know about a particular business practice, it's a good sign you shouldn't do it!”